Acknowledging Territories

 

Acknowledging territory shows recognition of and respect for Indigenous Peoples. It is recognition of their presence both in the past and the present. Recognition and respect are essential elements of establishing healthy, reciprocal relations. These relationships are key to reconciliation, a process to which CDSBEO is committed.

 

However, acknowledging territory is only the beginning of cultivating strong relationships with the First Peoples of Canada. CDSBEO recognizes that acknowledging the territory is an important step to reaching out to local Indigenous communities to open pathways for dialogue.

This is a general guide.  It is important to make yourself aware of the area in which your event is taking place.  If you are unsure, it is best to ask a local Indigenous community member.

 

For the Ottawa area (including Kemptville, Lanark, Hammond, Vankleek Hill):

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishnaabeg people.

See map:  http://www.tanakiwin.com/imap.html

In areas where the land has been used by different peoples throughout our history (area around Kingston, Gananoque, Brockville):

We [I] would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of Haudenosaunee (Ho den oh show nee) and Anishinaabeg (A niche na beg) peoples.

 

In Mohawk territory (Cornwall):

We give thanks… As we gather today on traditional Haudenosaunee (ho den oh show nee) land in the Mohawk territory.